Ukraine received the entire Slovak MiG-29 fleet, with several Bulgarian Su-25s

Twelve MiG-29 Fulcrum fighters, including one that the Slovak Air Force employed as a trainer, will be transferred to Ukraine from Slovakia. The gift was made possible by a bilateral agreement between the Czech Republic and Slovakia, according to which the Czech Air Force will defend Slovakia’s airspace until Bratislava receives the 12 F-16 Block 70 aircraft the US has purchased for delivery in the near future. The data was obtained from the Spanish-language web resource InfoDifensa.

One of the first nations in the world to elect to buy the infamous F-16 Block 70 in its most recent iteration was Slovakia. The new F-16s were scheduled to arrive in Slovakia in the middle of 2020, as per the deal that the US and Slovakia had agreed. However, the then-raging coronavirus pandemic also had an impact on the Greenville facility, forcing the Americans to rethink their plans for delivery to each nation, including Bulgaria, which is next in line after Slovakia and is anticipating its eight F-16 Block 70/72 aircraft.

Su-25 from Bulgaria

According to the same publication [InfoDefensa], 14 Soviet Su-25 Grach combat aircraft have currently been delivered to Ukraine. As “Bulgaria transfers them in the disassembled condition through third parties,” InfoDifensa noted, the transport allegedly took occurred recently. Regarding Bulgarian combat aircraft, InfoDefensa states, “Perhaps these are the ones to which the press secretary of the United States Department of Defense John Kirby was referring when he revealed last April that Ukrainian forces already had more fixed-wing combat aircraft in the second half of April than two weeks earlier.

Military Cognizance recalls that the USA stated that Ukraine “had more fixed-wing fighters now than they did two weeks ago” at the end of April. Kirby declines to specify where the extra gadgets came from but acknowledges that foreign aid is to blame. He asserted that the country’s fleet expansion “is not a coincidence,” as other countries with expertise in this type of aircraft were able to assist Ukraine in launching more aircraft.

At the time, the Pentagon official made hints that Kyiv would already have access to these gadgets and that they had already gotten some spare parts and help that would enable them to take to the skies again. But Kirby said that he did not want to “go into what other nations are offering” because of the risk it may provide if Moscow judged that the provision of that stuff suggests direct NATO involvement in the battle. This was said during a press conference held at the time.

Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2022

On February 21, 2022, the Russian government stated that Ukrainian fire on the Russia-Ukraine border had destroyed an FSB border facility and killed 5 Ukrainian soldiers who were attempting to enter Russian territory. Both instances were referred to as false flags and Ukraine denied any involvement.

Putin said that not only in their de facto held areas but also across the entirety of the Ukrainian Oblasts, the Russian government recognised the self-declared DPR and LPR as independent entities on the same day and ordered Russian soldiers, including tanks, to enter the regions.

Vladimir Putin, the president of Russia, gave the order for his country’s armed forces, which had previously been stationed along the border, to invade Ukraine on February 24, 2022. Following the invasion, the nation was subjected to targeted attacks on military facilities, and tanks crossed the border from Belarus.

Despite the fact that the invasion of Ukraine is a “war,” Russia has not yet acknowledged it as such, instead calling it a “special military operation.” According to the UN, where Russia has a permanent representative, a resolution from the UN is required for a military operation to be deemed a “special military operation.” There is no resolution that categorically labels Russian military actions as invasions and acts of war against civilians of Ukraine.

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