Taiwan’s Hung Phong IIE cruise missile’s firepower

A cruise missile made in Taiwan called the Hung Phong IIE (China) is intended only for use against land targets.

Hung Phong IIE is now one of Taiwan’s longest-range cruise missiles, according to 19Fortyfive (China). It is a type of Hung Phong anti-ship missile made by the Trung Son Institute of Science and Technology that is used to strike terrestrial targets.

The Hung Phong IIE’s military GPS system, which enables the missile to modify its direction of travel while attacking in order to avoid being intercepted, is its most notable feature. The missile measures 6 metres in length, with a body diameter of 0.5 metres, a launch weight of 980 kilogrammes, and a 200 kilogramme explosive warhead.

Hung Phong IIE missiles from Taiwan (China). Image: NCSIST

The Hung Phong IIE’s construction started in 2001. Prior to the Hung Phong IIE programme, the majority of Taiwan’s missiles had a maximum range of only 200 kilometres.

This missile gives Taiwan the ability to launch raid campaigns against strategic locations in the area with a recorded average attack range of 600 km. The Taipei administration revealed intentions to boost the annual production of missiles from 207 to 497, with an emphasis on growing the Xiongfeng IIE stockpile, earlier this year.

The Tomahawk cruise missile (RGM-109) of the US military and the Hung Phong IIE are both regarded variations of the renowned Hung Phong anti-ship missile. The maximum range has been raised from the original version’s 500 km to 800 km with better versions over time. A highly destructive warhead that can breach bunkers is attached to the missile.

The US has frequently urged Taiwan to exercise caution when creating Hung Phong IIE missiles because of their potential to spark unwarranted tensions. Taiwan persisted in pushing for the development of additional assault missiles, even deploying some upgraded Hung Phong IIE missiles all across the island.

Leave a Comment